Archive for the ‘Projects’ Category

Trail-Road Intersections Trimming July 2014, part 1

Visibility at trail-road intersections is an important issue on the Silver Comet Trail. Cars need to see cyclists and of course, the cyclists need to see cars at trail-road intersections. Paulding County has several intersections that require regular trimming. I’ve been doing this for the last three years. The effects of trimming shrubbery and trees can have a dramatic effect on visibility and safety at road crossings.

Note: click images for larger view.

Eisley-Stamper Road: view North

Before:
Only 30-40 ft from the intersection and the north view of the road is completely obscured by the shrubbery.

Eisley-Stamper

Eisley-Stamper view north, before.

After trimming:
Cyclists have a clear view of the road to the North. This allows them to focus their attention on the more hazardous south view which has an adjacent cross-street (Rosedale Rd) with turning traffic. No, my truck wasn’t moved between photos; before, it was completely hidden from view.

Eisley-Stamper view north, after trimming.

Eisley-Stamper view north, after trimming.

Wyandotte Road: view South

Was a major problem for visibility of vehicles. Ground cover had grown to a height which completely hid the view of approaching vehicles.
Before: The road is completely obscured from view.

Wyandotte Rd: view South.

Wyandotte Rd: view South, before.

After trimming: A dramatic improvement, the road is clearly visible.

Wyandotte Rd: view South, after.

Wyandotte Rd: view South, after.

After trimming: view approaching intersection.
Now, after trimming, the south road is completely visible to approaching cyclists.

Wyandotte Rd: view South, after, approaching intersection.

Wyandotte Rd: view South, after, approaching intersection.

Both access roads into the Paulding Waste Water Treatment Plant were also trimmed.

Little guy on the trail

image

Little guy I had to move off the trail while cleaning on thursday

Visibility and Safety on the Silver Comet Trail.

It was a couple of months ago when I was negotiating the the road crossing at the east entrance to the treatment plant.  A commercial tank truck came out of the facility at around 20 MPH and never even slowed down to cross the the trail.  A cyclist could have been seriously injured or killed by a negligent driver in this situation.   This is a fast section of trail traveling east.  Bamboo and shrub growth completely obscured the view on the north side of the trail and shrubbery obscured much of the view to the gate at the treatment plant.

Click images to enlarge.

Bamboo growth before cutting.  Also note the shrubbery on the opposite side which obscured the view of the plant entrance.

Bamboo obscurring view of the trail from the road.

Bamboo obscuring view of the trail from the road.

The Echo pole mounted hedge shear did an incredible job of cutting the bamboo.  Known for it’s toughness, the bamboo was no match for the echo shear.  There was also dense patches of the vines, privet and other shrubbery.  I used the pole shear to whittle this tangled mass down to debris.  I needed the chain saw to remove thicker growth which obscured much of the view of the gate on the south side.  I worked until I could no longer muster the strength to handle the equipment.

After much work, cutting the bamboo and tangled masses of growth…  the trail is clearly visible from the road.  It left quite a mess, but I have no means to remove the debris.  However, there is now a clear view all the way to the treatment plant fence line.  I trimmed shrubbery on the opposite side of road too, the effect was not nearly as dramatic because of the earthen berms adjacent to the trail.  Speeds from this side of the trail aren’t as high either because the grade is slightly uphill.

After much cutting and trimming.

After much cutting and trimming.

View of road from the trail.

View of road from the trail.

Treatment plant entrance, viewed from trail.

Treatment plant entrance, viewed from trail.

Busy week working on the Silver Comet Trail.

Mud removal at GA61 & 92 bridges, ran the trail blower Thursday 52mi, then cut back shrubbery at the treatment plant on Friday.  It was a lot of work.  Hard rides on Tues, Thur and Saturday… by Saturday afternoon I was toast.

The recent storm was intense and left mud on the trail at the GA 61 and 92 bridge crossings.  I’ve called GA DOT in the past but they have failed to take measures to improve on the erosion problems that leave mud on the trail.   The mud in sections of the trail was 2-3″  deep, a real safety hazard.  The worst section was at the GA Hwy61 crossing. Sorry, it was getting late, I was tired and neglected to get “after” photos.  Shoveling mud is more work that shoveling dirt, it’s much heavier.

Click the images to englarge.

Mud at GA61 bridge.

Mud at GA61 bridge.

Mud at GA61 bridge.

Mud at GA61 bridge.

The muddy area at GA92 was larger and required much more pushing to get the mud collected, then shoveled off.  While not as thick as the mud at Hwy 61, was wet and slick.

Mud at GA92 bridge, before.

Mud at GA92 bridge, before.

Mud at GA92 bridge, after.

Mud at GA92 bridge, after.

Hazardous RxR Crossing Signs

As an interim measure to reduce the potential for accidents at the Old Cedartown Rd rail crossing on the Silver Comet Trail, I’ve designed a couple of signs.  The first sign conveys the severity of the hazard and second sign is a guide for cyclists on appropriate methods to cross the rails without having their wheels trapped in the rail flange.  I plan to deploy the warning signs on both sides of the trail pending approval by the Path Foundation and GRITS.

The first sign is intended to convey the severity of the hazard:  (click images to enlarge)

RxR Crash Hazard

RxR Crash Hazard

The second sign encourages riders to dismount and walk their bikes over the rails or ride over at an angle perpendicular to the rails:

RxR Crossing Methods

RxR Crossing Methods

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